The Illustrated London News

Home | About | Introduction | Bibliography | Articles | Illustrations | Search | Links

Foreign and Colonial Intelligence

The Illustrated London News, vol. 45, no. 1290, p. 551.

December 3, 1864

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL INTELLIGENCE.
AMERICA.

We have news from New York to the evening of the 19th ult. There was still no certain intelligence respecting General Sherman's movements, but it was positively affirmed that the Federals had evacuated Atlanta, after destroying all the fortifications, public buildings, and railways; and the Richmond journals said that the evacuation took place on the 12th ult. It was reported in the North that General Sherman, with 50,000 men, was moving towards Macon and Augusta; but, according to the Richmond newspapers, one column of his army was marching on Selma, in Alabama. It was said that the Confederate General Hood had concentrated his forces at Florence, in Alabama, but the rumour was as uncertain as the accounts of General Sherman's movements; and it was also asserted that a large body of Confederates, under General Beauregard, was advancing from Corinth towards Memphis.

The Confederate General Breckenridge had defeated the Federal General Gillem at Bull's Gap, in East Tennessee, and had taken six guns and 400 prisoners.

A rumour that the Confederates had captured Morganzia, in Louisiana, with 1900 prisoners, had been transmitted from Mobile to Richmond.

It was asserted that General Early was retiring up the Shenandoah Valley, and that the Federals, under General Sheridan, were following him. The Confederates made a dash at Grant's left, but were repulsed.

There had not been any fresh fighting in the neighbourhood of Richmond or Petersburg. General Butler had resumed the command of the Federal troops on the north bank of the James River.

On the question of the arming of the slaves being discussed in the Confederate Congress, the plan was opposed by a large number of members.

It was rumoured that President Lincoln was about to send commissioners to Richmond, for the purpose of proffering to the South peace upon, it was supposed, the conditions that a general amnesty be granted, and that the Southern States return to the Union with all their rights and privileges, and that slavery be abolished.

The French Minister and Mr. Seward have had interviews on the question of peace. The former expressed the strong wish of the Emperor for peace.

The New York papers state that President Lincoln wishes that those desirous to call upon him personally will postpone their visits for a time, as he is engaged in preparing his annual Message to Congress.

A grand reception was given to General Butler at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, on the 14th ult. General Butler suggested that an amnesty should now be offered to the Confederates, and that if they did not accept it there should be a short, sharp, and decisive war, to be followed by a partition of Southern lands among the soldiers. On the following day General Butler quitted New York to rejoin the army before Richmond, issuing, before doing so, a general order congratulating all concerned upon the peaceful termination of his mission.

General Sheridan had been nominated as senior Major-General in the United States army, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of General M'Clellan.

Lieutenant-Governor Jacobs, of Kentucky, has been arrested and taken to Washington as a state prisoner. The charge against him has not transpired.

There had been violent fluctuations in the price of gold at New York, in consequence of the Treasury payment of 9,000,000 dols. in gold in advance of the interest on the gold-bearing debt, and also of rumours that General Sherman had obtained considerable successes; but the latest quotation on the 19th ult. was 121 per cent premium.

Lord Lyons is about to return from Washington on six months' leave, necessitated by ill-health. The statement that his Lordship has resigned his post is, however, erroneous. Mr. J. Hume Burnley, Secretary of Legation, has been appointed Chargé d'Affaires, in the usual course, during Lord Lyons's absence.

Previous: [One Pleasing and Hopeful Feature]ArticleVolume 45, no.1266, p. 1 (1 paragraph)
Next: [The Cable of the Victoria Extension]Articlevol. 45, no. 1290, p. 559 (1 paragraph)
Article List for: Illustrated London News: Volume 45

Download Article as Plain Text

Search Entire Text

Keyword
Title
Article Date

University Libraries | Beck Center | | Emory University
A Joint Project by Sandra J. Still, Emily E. Katt, Collection Management, and the Beck Center.

Powered by TEI