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Foreign Intelligence

The Illustrated London News, vol. 42, no. 1198, p. 399.

April 11, 1863

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.
AMERICA.

By the arrival of the steamers Edinburg and Norwegian we have telegrams from New York to the evening of the 27th ult.

War News.

There in nothing new from the Rappahannock, except the rumour that General Lee intends falling back upon Richmond.

From Port Royal it is reported that a fleet of seven ironclads left that place on the 22nd ult. Their supposed destination is Charleston.

The negro expedition from Port Royal to Florida had captured Jacksonville, in that State, after routing a body of Confederate cavalry.

The truth concerning the engagement at Port Hudson establishes itself but slowly. It is admitted on both sides that the Federal steamer Mississippi was lost, and that two steamers passed the batteries. These were the Hartford, Admiral Farragut's flagship, and the Monongahela, which have arrived safely at Vicksburg. General Banks failed to make a land attack, and fell back upon his fortified camp. Northern accounts state that Admiral Farragut's vessels recaptured the steamer Indianola without resistance. The Hartford anchored off Natchez on the 16th, and the Admiral informed the authorities that if the Federal vessels were fired upon he would bombard the city. Admiral Farragut left the following morning.

The water has been let into the canal at Lake Providence. The aperture is 20 ft. wide, and is still widening. The water is pouring in with great force, and the greater part of the town of Lake Providence was submerged.

At Vicksburg the Confederates are said to be living almost exclusively on corn meal. The river is falling, and the fears entertained of an overflow of the Federal camping-ground have subsided. A coalbarge, with 1000 bushels of coal, had been floated past Vicksburg batteries for the use of Farragut's vessels.

The Memphis Bulletin asserts that three of Admiral Porter's gun-boats have reached Yazoo River through Sunflower River and arrived at Greenwood. The Federals at Greenwood had abandoned the attempt to pass Fort Pemberton, at the junction of the Yallabusha and Tallahatchie Rivers, and were returning to Yazoo Pass. It is supposed that Admiral Porter's arrival would stimulate them to renew the attack.

The privateer Florida coaled at Barbados on the 23rd ult., and her captain dined with the Governor. Admiral Wilkes subsequently refused an invitation to dine with the Governor.

The steamer Aries and another vessel were at St. Thomas on the l6th inst. Admiral Wilkes threatened to seize those vessels if they left port, on the charge that they were blockade-runners. The captain of the Aries applied to the British steamer Phaeton for protection, which was granted. The Vanderbilt then sailed out of port, and the other vessel was conveyed out by the Phaeton.

The British steamer Georgiana has been driven ashore on Long Island, South Carolina, in an attempt to run the blockade of Charleston. She had a large cargo of dry goods, medicines, and artillery, valued at 1,000,000 dols. She was scuttled by the captain to prevent her capture, and was afterwards shelled and destroyed by the Federals. The British steamer Nicholas has been captured while endeavouring to run the blockade at Wilmington, North Carolina. She previously made an effort to enter Charleston. The British steamer Peterhoff, bound for the Mexican port of Matamoras, and captured by Admiral Wilkes, has been taken from Key West to New York for adjudication.

Western Virginia.

The new State Constitution of Western Virginia has been ratified by the vote of the people. The Constitution provides that the children of slaves born after July next shall be free. All slaves under ten years of age shall be free when they reach twenty-one years. All slaves over ten and under twenty-one shall be free at twenty-five years of age. No fugitive slaves will be permitted to come into the State to settle there. These provisions are, in point of fact, only applicable to about l0,000 slaves.

Miscellaneous.

The New Jersey Assembly, by a vote of 33 to 10, has passed an Act for the imprisonment and transportation of every free negro who shall hereafter come into the State and remain ten days.

Major-General Edwin V. Sumner died at Syracuse, New York, on the 21st ult. He was one of the oldest Generals in the army, having been in the service over forty-three years. His last words were, "God save my country, the United States of America."

A committee for the relief of the distress of the poor in the North and West of Ireland has been formed in New York, and has collected already a sum of several thousand dollars.

Considerable movements and many strikes are taking place among the working men of New York for higher wages. A large meeting has been held and resolutions passed to organise a league of all trades for the better security of the rights of labour. The speakers complained of the rise of the prices of food, clothing, and rent, and declared their intention to resist the encroachments of capital.

It is reported that Secretary Chase will not put a loan on the market for some time. The Government is said to be receiving daily, from different sources, nearly 2½ million dollars, which amount covers the daily expenses of the war. The sale of Five-dollar Twenty-cent Bonds continues to increase; and the demand for these bonds, on foreign account, is stated to be large. Gold continues to fall. It is now at 4l½ premium.

California.

It was believed the project to establish a British line of steamers between California and China would be abandoned.

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