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Illustrations of the Civil War in America, From sketches by Our Special Artist: Franklin's Brigade Passing Arlington Mill on its Way to Occupy Munson's Hill. and A Portion of the Confederate Works on Munson's Hill. and General M'Clellan Occupying the Confederate Position at Munson's Hill.

The Illustrated London News, vol. 39, no. 1114, p. 438.

October 26, 1861

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Illustrations of the Civil War in America. From sketches by Our Special Artist: Franklin's Brigade Passing Arlington Mill on its Way to Occupy Munson's Hill. and A Portion of the Confederate Works on Munson's Hill. and General M'Clellan Occupying the Confederate Position at Munson's Hill.

The Confederates having evacuted Munson's-hill, and other positions before Washington, they have been occupied, as previously reported, by the Federals as far as Lewinsville. A great part of the defences of the Confederates were make-believe, painted logs for guns, and so forth. The scene at the top of the hill, in the earthwork itself, was (says one account) one of the most amusing that could be imagined. Everybody was laughing. The utter absurdity of the works as means of defence, their smallness, meanness, insignificance, touched everybody's sense of the ludicrous. The inclosure comprises about four acres, around which earth is roughly thrown up to a height of perhaps four feet. Of course there is no ditch, no glacis—nothing, in fact, to give it the character of a fortification of any kind. It is not even regular in form, but coils loosely and waveringly about the ground, as a huge snake might enfold it. In every respect it looks a squirmy piece of work. There are no embrasures for guns, but upon two of its projections are mounted—what? guns? No, indeed, but old logs, with a black circle painted in the centre of the sawed part to represent a formidable armament. At such a distance as that of Bailey's—roads the deception might very easily have remained undetected. In the middle of this wretched "fort" the remains of a hastily-constructed hut still stood, but, with the exception of a few trees, it contained nothing else. Behind it, on the slope of the hill, were a group of irregular shanties, thrown together for the protection of troops. Their number was sufficient for the accommodation of about one regiment—certainly not more.

Our special Artist has sent us three Sketches, herewith engraved, in connection with the advance of the Federalists on Munson's-hill. At the left of the last Illustration is depicted Count de Paris (alias Captain Louis d'Orleans), and next to him is the Duc de Chartres (alias Captain Robert d'Orleans), both of whom are on General M'Clellan's Staff.

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